Reduce congestion: 5 easy steps

by Dr. Laura Brown
on 17 November 2014
Hits: 2554

Thyme, eucalyptus and lavender oils are antimicrobial. Thyme is the strongest. Local application of the antimicrobials via steam inhalation will help combat any virus or bacterial infection. The mucus will be liquefied and expelled from the respiratory tract with the hot, wet air. Heating the nasal passages with the condensing steam increases circulation to the respiratory tract and decreases congestion. A nasal saline rinse is a great follow-up to this treatment.

STEAM INHALATION

Gather:

Large mixing bowl- place on table
2-3 drops Essential oil – eucalyptus, thyme or lavender
Boiled, hot water
Bath-size towel

  1. Set timer to 8 minutes (i.e. microwave, phone timer)
  2. Position face over bowl
  3. Pull towel over top
  4. Seal tent with arms around edges
  5. Close eyes & breathe through nose.

Directions: Fill the mixing bowl half way with boiled, hot water. Get bath-sized towel ready to make a tent over your head. Set the timer for 8 minutes. Sit up with head over bowl, towel over head and bowl, arms sealing sides of the “towel tent”.

Sometimes the vapours can seem too strong. If this is the case, open up side of tent for a few seconds to allow just a little vapour to escape, then seal it back up again.

Stay under the steam inhalation tent until the 8 minute timer goes off.

Repeat up to 3 times daily. Thyme, eucalyptus and lavender oils are antimicrobial. Thyme is the strongest. Local application of the antimicrobials via steam inhalation will help combat any virus or bacterial infection. The mucus will be liquified and expelled from the respiratory tract with the hot, wet air. Heating the nasal passages with the condensing steam increases circulation to the respiratory tract and decreases congestion. A nasal saline rinse is a great follow-up to this treatment.

Keep essential oils out of reach of children. Procedure recommended for adults only. Extremely young or old may not be able to respond to the heat. Contraindicated in those with congestive heart failure, asthma, or serious heart or respiratory conditions as the moist heat may further comprise breathing. This procedure is to be used at own risk and does not constitute medical advice or replace the need for you to see your primary care physician.

References:

Boyle W., Saine A. (1995) Lectures in naturopathic hydrotherapy. Eclectic Medical Publications. Oregon.

Godfrey A., Saunders P. (2010) Principles and practices of naturopathic botanical medicine. CCNM Press. Toronto. 

Leave your comments

Post comment as a guest

0
terms and conditions.

Comments (3)